Sunday, April 20, 2014

Today in History, January 1914

By LOUIS REED, local historian | 1/22/2014

• Two bloodhounds are on the supposed trail of the persons who entered the house of Lyman Dickey at Eighth and Main streets last night and stole a valuable gold watch. The dogs took up the trail at noon today from the Dickey home and led out Main street to the Truman Gates’ home. Then the dogs went through the Gates’ chicken yard and down to the Santa Fe tracks. The tracks were being followed about five miles south of Ottawa at 3 o’clock this afternoon.

• At a test made today by John H. Suttle, supervising architect for Ottawa’s new post office building, the big boiler installed some time ago was found to be defective and will have to be replaced by another that will comply with the government requirements. The test prescribed by the government is much more rigid than that to which boilers are usually subjected, and it was found that the boiler will not stand the test. The work of setting stone for the new building was commenced in earnest today, and the building site presented a spectacle of unusual activity. Four men are at work setting the stone at present and a force large enough to rush the work rapidly to completion will be put on as soon as more stone arrives.

• Two bloodhounds are on the supposed trail of the persons who entered the house of Lyman Dickey at Eighth and Main streets last night and stole a valuable gold watch. The dogs took up the trail at noon today from the Dickey home and led out Main street to the Truman Gates’ home. Then the dogs went through the Gates’ chicken yard and down to the Santa Fe tracks. The tracks were being followed about five miles south of Ottawa at 3 o’clock this afternoon.

• At a test made today by John H. Suttle, supervising architect for Ottawa’s new post office building, the big boiler installed some time ago was found to be defective and will have to be replaced by another that will comply with the government requirements. The test prescribed by the government is much more rigid than that to which boilers are usually subjected, and it was found that the boiler will not stand the test. The work of setting stone for the new building was commenced in earnest today, and the building site presented a spectacle of unusual activity. Four men are at work setting the stone at present and a force large enough to rush the work rapidly to completion will be put on as soon as more stone arrives.

• The foundation for the new Valley View and Mud Creek club house is nearly completed, and the furnace was installed today. The work is being pushed rapidly, and the builders hope to have the building completed this month if the weather remains favorable.

• WASHINGTON — A constitutional amendment resolution to grant suffrage to women, was on the verge of disposition in the U.S. Senate, the speech on the subject by Sen. Ashurst, in charge of the measure, alone preventing its coming to a vote.

• WASHINGTON — Mrs. Lottie Bleakley, Topeka, will now have unquestioned possession of Marion Bleakley, the famous “incubator baby” who has attracted notice from all over the United States. This follows the decision yesterday of the U.S. Supreme Court dismissing the latest move in the possession of the child, because both sides of the controversy had failed to have the record printed. The baby practically has lived in court during her tempestuous life. She was born in a hospital in St. Louis Feb. 15, 1904. She weighed only 2 pounds and was sent to the baby concession at the World’s Fair, where she remained in an incubator through the summer.

James G. Barcley and Stella Barclay were in charge of the concession. They adopted the baby and took her to their home in Illinois. After the child — Marion is her name — was adopted, Mrs. Robert Bleakley, Lawrence, Kan., the mother, who had been informed that her baby was dead, learned her whereabouts and claimed her. This started litigation, which has lasted nearly 10 years.

The Illinois court first decided in favor of Mrs. Bleakley. She took her child to Lawrence. Meanwhile, Mrs. Barclay had appealed.

In January 1906, with the Illinois case still pending, Mrs. Barclay brought habeas corpus proceedings in the district court at Lawrence. The Kansas court gave a verdict in her favor.

Mrs. Bleakley, however, escaped by a ruse with the child on the same day the district court decided against her. For a time, she hid in the Indian Territory. Later, she took an appeal and the Kansas Supreme Court sustained her. A week after the Kansas court rendered its decision the Illinois Court of Appeals reversed the case begun at Moline, ruling that the Barclays were legally entitled to the child.

Mrs. Barclay began a three years’ search for the baby and found it in Topeka in August 1909. The baby was kidnapped from school after a street fight in which a relative of Mrs. Bleakley’s was shot. Fearing a conviction in the Topeka courts, Mrs. Barclay went before Judge Porterfield in Kansas City and surrendered all claim to the child.

A day or two later, the Topeka authorities arrested J.M. Gentry, F.H. Tillotson, a Kansas City detective, and Mrs. Barclay for the kidnaping. Tillotson was convicted of kidnaping and Gentry of assault. Each was given a sentence of one to five years in the penitentiary. Both appealed to the Kansas Supreme Court, but the sentences were affirmed in both cases. Gentry served the minimum sentence, and Tillotson appealed to the United States Supreme Court. Mrs. Barclay is supposed to be living in Buffalo, N.Y.

• Cooperation! Mutuality! Reciprocity! Around those three words were wound the gist of the biggest meeting ever held in Franklin County in the interests of the community’s general good. They formed the keynote of the remarks of 10 men last night at the banquet given by the Franklin County Retail Merchants in honor of the farmers who belong. There were 220 men present, and almost 100 of these were farmers.

• At a meeting of the gymnasium committee held at the college yesterday afternoon it was decided that Ottawa University’s new gymnasium shall be built of native blue limestone, which can be quarried near Ottawa.

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