Thursday, July 24, 2014

Today in History, March 1914

By LOUIS REED, local historian | 3/7/2014

• TOPEKA — An investigation into the cost and value of different subjects taught in the Kansas schools and the making of efficiency tests for the secondary schools may be made to the school of education at the university. Standards of efficiency have been worked out in spelling, and each teacher should be required to maintain that efficiency. The same should be true in other subjects, and a teacher who cannot keep up to the standard should be dropped.

• SYRACUSE, Kan. — G.R. Frazier, a prominent ranch man living 12 miles southwest of Johnson City, Stanton County, lies at the point of death in the Rex Hotel here as the result of an old range feud with L.D. Rorick, a neighboring ranch man. Rorick and Frazier have fought for possession of some grazing land in the courts at Johnson city for years without result. For several weeks, each had been under a peace bond. A few days ago, Rorick went to the Frazier ranch. A fight followed in which knives were used. Rorick received bad cuts along the head and chest. Frazier’s wounds were deep-seated gashes in the sides and chest.

• TOPEKA — An investigation into the cost and value of different subjects taught in the Kansas schools and the making of efficiency tests for the secondary schools may be made to the school of education at the university. Standards of efficiency have been worked out in spelling, and each teacher should be required to maintain that efficiency. The same should be true in other subjects, and a teacher who cannot keep up to the standard should be dropped.

• SYRACUSE, Kan. — G.R. Frazier, a prominent ranch man living 12 miles southwest of Johnson City, Stanton County, lies at the point of death in the Rex Hotel here as the result of an old range feud with L.D. Rorick, a neighboring ranch man. Rorick and Frazier have fought for possession of some grazing land in the courts at Johnson city for years without result. For several weeks, each had been under a peace bond. A few days ago, Rorick went to the Frazier ranch. A fight followed in which knives were used. Rorick received bad cuts along the head and chest. Frazier’s wounds were deep-seated gashes in the sides and chest.

• The officers received word late yesterday that a dead man was lying in a road near the former W.B. Gates farm northwest of Ottawa. Investigation by residents found the man was drunk. He was cared for during the night at a farmhouse.

• Jesse Caylor, who was shot yesterday morning by James Gregg in Miami County near Stanton, is still alive this afternoon and was resting easily from the wound from the pistol shot. Gregg is now in jail at Paola. Telegraph dispatches from Osawatomie say that one of Gregg’s sons and a Caylor boy were quarreling and that the older men took up the strife.

• WASHINGTON — All phases of the women’s suffrage question were presented to the House judiciary committee yesterday, accompanied by cheers, jeers, hisses and applause. Anti-suffragists told the committee that woman suffrage would be harmful “not only to women, but to the country.” At the conclusion of the hearings, Dr. Mary Walker, trousered and silk hatted, presented to the committee what she called “the crowning constitutional argument” to show that women already have the right to vote under the constitution.

• The laying of the cornerstone to Ottawa’s new $65,000 post office at Second and Hickory streets occurred today. A crowd of more than 2,500 persons were present for the ceremony conducted by the Grand Lodge of the Masonry and about 50 members of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR).

• Susie Plank of this city and formerly of Greenwood Township, center of attraction in an alienation suit a few years ago, became a bride again this afternoon. Several years ago, Susie’s mother-in-law at the time, Augusta Plank, sued Susie for alienation claiming her husband paid more attention to Susie than he did to her.

• The Wellsville girls basketball team came off victorious in the tournament at Baldwin Friday and Saturday. The team received a silver loving cup and will take part in the state tournament to be at Emporia early in April. Wellsville is the only Franklin County town to enter a girls team in the Baldwin meet. Pomona, Richmond and Wellsville had teams of boys in the field, but they were matched against much stronger teams and did not get in the finals. The members of the victorious team of girls are Ida Boyd, Marvil Waddle, Ella Hay, Marion Rice, Carrie Pruett, Fay Rose and Dorothy Preshaw.

• It isn’t often that a person can lose a purse containing $100 and get it back again, but that is the experience of Miss Hallie Gasaway, who arrived this morning from Williamsburg, where she gave an entertainment last Saturday night. The entertainment was given in the school house, and after reaching her room she missed her purse. The janitor had found it, and returned it to her. She rewarded him because you don’t always find people so honest. The money was all in bills and would have been easy to keep.

• The supper given at the Semple Sanitarium Saturday evening was a successful one in every way and was as unique as it was successful. Fifty-five guests were seated at the tables and enjoyed a splendid spread. The party was given by Mrs. Semple to all the workmen who had ever worked on the sanitarium. The only rule of procedure at the banquet was that politics was barred as a subject of discussion.

• Ex-Fire Chief Lee Phares, Ottawa, while on duty as chief often made the statement that it was not every horse you could throw the harness on that would make a fire horse. Also it was not every man you could put a fireman’s uniform on who would make a firefighter. The fact was well proven at a smoldering fire in the basement of a farm house a few miles from town a couple of weeks ago. They phoned around the neighborhood for help and in a short time there were 50 or more men present, and only one man ventured in the blinding choking smoke, and with a few buckets of water put the fire out with but a few dollars loss. Otherwise in a short time, the flames would have broken out and caused something like a $10,000 loss.

• ST. LOUIS — Wesley Simon, on trial here for murder, was shot and killed during a recess of the court before which he was being tried. Simon was shot in a saloon by the principal witness for the prosecution. Simon was placed on trial today for the murder of Emmett Carroll in a gang feud nearly a year ago.

• February was the most wintry month of the winter. There were more storms and more precipitation last month than during any month of the winter so far. The total fall of snow during the month was 12.5 inches, and the rainfall amounted to 1.98 inches.

• The registration for the primary to be held next Tuesday to nominate two men for the mayoralty election breaks all previous registration records by 328. The total registration for the primary is 3,364 men and women. There are 1,987 men and 1,377 women eligible to cast a ballot next Tuesday.

• Republican office-seekers are trying hard to make the voters believe the Republican Party has reformed; that there has been some change in the organization whereby it has become progressive. ... No true American can care to dwell on the details of the Republican record that year, it is and will forever remain one of the darkest stains on the pages of American history, but the people cannot forget it so long as the party controlled by the men who made that record asks for the votes of the people. ... Republican candidates are making every effort to hoodwink the people and make them believe that the party has made some changes from a progressive standpoint. ... They all agreed that the Republican National Committee must go, and declared that there was no hope for the party so long as it was dominated by the men who had forced the nomination of Taft.

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