Saturday, August 23, 2014

Today in History, April 1914

By LOUIS REED, local historian | 4/7/2014

• QUENEMO — At a recent referendum, Quenemo decided to have an electric lighting system and buy its current from Ottawa on a line to be erected this spring. The vote was 13 against to 134 for the project. Some of the 13 favored buying the “juice” from Lyndon.

• Twice as many acres of alfalfa are grown in Kansas as in any other state. Jewell County stands first in Kansas in alfalfa production.

• QUENEMO — At a recent referendum, Quenemo decided to have an electric lighting system and buy its current from Ottawa on a line to be erected this spring. The vote was 13 against to 134 for the project. Some of the 13 favored buying the “juice” from Lyndon.

• Twice as many acres of alfalfa are grown in Kansas as in any other state. Jewell County stands first in Kansas in alfalfa production.

• All records in Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma for cold at this time of the year were broken this morning and the local observer predicts the mercury will go several degrees lower tonight. The lowest Kansas temperature was 11 at Hays. The low in Ottawa was 27. The maximum temperature for today was 35. Several samples of ice were reported last night and most of them were more than a quarter of an inch thick on water buckets.

• Ottawa will have a personal representative to extend her invitation to the Colorado tourists to come through Ottawa next month when they make their tour to the gulf and return. C.J. Clark of this city left today for Colorado and he carried an invitation from President L.C. Jones of the Franklin County Retailers Association to A.W. Henderson, secretary of the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce. With the New Santa Fe Trail as the principal road across Kansas, the Colorado tourists will find it the best route for them and Ottawa will give them a royal welcome. H. Johnson, a local photographer has drawn a very clever cartoon which will be sent to the Colorado tourists. It shows a number of automobiles driving down Ottawa’s Main Street with Gormly’s Band playing and with citizens lined along the streets to give them a cordial welcome. The picture is a very attractive one and is done in colors.

• A pipeline to connect with Franklin County gas wells probably will be constructed for the Kansas Natural Gas Company this season. One of the first wells to be touched will be the one on the R.A. Thompson farm near the mouth of Tauy Creek. Mr. Burden, who is from Independence, is confident that a number of other strong wells can be brought in east of Ottawa and work will be continued through the spring and summer. Work will begin soon on a well on the W.G. Tulloss farm east of Ottawa. If the well on the Tulloss farm is a good one, there will be very little doubt but that the pipe line will be construct.

• Fifty-four Bulgarians were shipped in to work for a contractor on the Prairie Oil & Gas Co.’s new pipe line recently. They came in Friday, and the car carrying their tenting and cots did not arrive until Saturday afternoon. It put the men in a predicament. As a rule, they are not disposed to be very particular about their accommodations. But in this case, it was either sit all night in the depot for them, or bunk on the bar floor of a second story building with out a stove or blankets to keep them warm.

• The distillers association is sending out a new argument against prohibition. It says that prohibition “ruined the grape industry in Kansas.” It claims that in the 1880s this industry was more than $200,000 per year and it is estimated as less than $25,000 now. The grape wasn’t the only industry ruined by prohibition, says Henry J. Allen, in the Wichita Beacon. There was the mint industry. Prohibition killed the mint julep, hence there was no more demand for mint except in a few homes, where they made mint sauce for spring lamb dressing. Then there was the blow to the egg industry. Men no longer use eggs for eggnog, since the eggnog departed. When prohibition came, the hens had been doing their best in their free way to keep the egg industry alive and you could get eggs for 8 cents a dozen. Since prohibition hit the egg industry, you have to pay 2 cents apiece for eggs. Prohibition took the life out of the hens. They do not seem to have anything to cackle about since the saloon left us.

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