Thursday, July 31, 2014

Today in History, April 1914

by LOUIS REED, local historian | 4/16/2014

April 1914

• John Dyer, 77, Baldwin, was thrown from a buggy at First and Main streets at noon today when the buggy was struck by Missouri Pacific passenger train No. 3, westbound. Mr. Dyer jumped up quickly, brushed the dust from his clothing and smilingly told the excited crowd that he wasn’t hurt. At the crossing at First Street, Mr. Costigan heard the passenger train coming and attempted to stop the horses on the north side of the tracks. They became frightened and ran diagonally across the tracks just in front of the rapidly moving passenger train. The team had just cleared the track when the pilot of the engine struck the rear buggy wheels. The speed of the train was greatly reduced by that time because the engineer had applied the air when he saw the impending danger. The buggy was thrown against the bag station, and the horses were standing on the sidewalk in front of the Occidental Hotel. A passenger in the buggy, Mr. Costigan held to the reins and was not thrown from the buggy.

April 1914

• John Dyer, 77, Baldwin, was thrown from a buggy at First and Main streets at noon today when the buggy was struck by Missouri Pacific passenger train No. 3, westbound. Mr. Dyer jumped up quickly, brushed the dust from his clothing and smilingly told the excited crowd that he wasn’t hurt. At the crossing at First Street, Mr. Costigan heard the passenger train coming and attempted to stop the horses on the north side of the tracks. They became frightened and ran diagonally across the tracks just in front of the rapidly moving passenger train. The team had just cleared the track when the pilot of the engine struck the rear buggy wheels. The speed of the train was greatly reduced by that time because the engineer had applied the air when he saw the impending danger. The buggy was thrown against the bag station, and the horses were standing on the sidewalk in front of the Occidental Hotel. A passenger in the buggy, Mr. Costigan held to the reins and was not thrown from the buggy.

• The Semple Sanitarium, established 20 years ago by Mrs. Etta Semple who died Saturday night, might be converted into a general hospital or might later be taken up as a private institution. There are several proposals and, as yet, Matt Semple, husband of Mrs. Semple, has made no decision or announcement of the sanitarium’s policy.

• William Marks Jr. has sued for possession of a farm in Greenwood Township or for refund of $5,200 spent in paying off encumbrances when he believed his father wished to will the land to him.

• The first work in preparation for the construction of the new $30,000 gymnasium at Ottawa University was begun this morning when the old frame gymnasium building was raised to be moved from its present site southeast of the main building. It will be placed about 200 feet east of the present site and will be used for a barn and store house for the school. Washburn and Sons drew the plans for the new gymnasium.

• Two new city officers were sworn in this morning and will begin their duties at once. They are F.M. Harris, who was elected mayor of Ottawa last week, and R.S. Parker, who was chosen police judge to fill the unexpired term of the late J.P. Kerr.

• One of the first things taken up by the city commissioners this morning after the change in mayors was to have the city attorney take steps to collect on bonds given to two interurban firms in 1908. These were the Kansas City & Kansas Southwestern Railway Company and R.C. Rawlings. The former had a franchise to build a line down Main Street. The Rawlings line was to enter the city at Cedar Street. Each company gave a bond of $500 to begin work within one year. Now the bonds are forfeited and it was decided today that the city needs the money. The city attorney will begin work at once in an attempt to collect the money.

• There couldn’t have been a better day for Silo Day, and there couldn’t have been a much larger crowd looking at these farm conservers of product, than there was today at the Franklin County Courthouse. Almost every conceivable variety of silo was shown — from the big, life-sized wood silo set up on the pavement by the Milo R. Harris company of Ottawa who handles this variety to a tiny little tin model brought by a demonstrator from Topeka. Ensilage cutters formed a part of the attractions, and there was plenty of “spelling” done for each article. H.H. Crawford, who lives north of Ottawa in Ottawa Township, displayed a wooden stave silo made of 2-inch staves of fir. It is called the Jayhawker and was made in Ottawa. The material is shipped here and arrangements are being made with the Warner factories to manufacture the hoops.

• JUAREZ, Mexico — The defeat of the combined federal forces by rebels at San Pedro in Conhuali with the federal losses estimated at 2,800 killed and wounded and 700 prisoners and the rebel loss reported 650 killed and wounded.

• WASHINGTON — A naval demonstration on the Pacific fleet was ordered by the Secretary of the Navy late today which will bring the Pacific fleet in the vicinity of Mexico.

• The U.S. Army is preparing for action. There are 10,000 men at Texas City, near Galveston, which is only 70 hours or less by army transports from Tampico, Mexico, and they have been ordered to hold themselves in readiness. All throughout the nation, from Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont to the Presidio of San Francisco, soldiers are quietly making ready for possible action.

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