Tuesday, September 23, 2014

TODAY IN HISTORY: April 1914

By LOUIS REED, local historian | 4/25/2014

April 1914

• WASHINGTON — President Woodrow Wilson this afternoon sent the U.S. Congress a message asking the immediate appropriation of $500,000 for bringing the Americans in Mexico back to their homes. Both the president and his secretary of state today appeared care worn and sad following the complete capture of Vera Cruz.

April 1914

• WASHINGTON — President Woodrow Wilson this afternoon sent the U.S. Congress a message asking the immediate appropriation of $500,000 for bringing the Americans in Mexico back to their homes. Both the president and his secretary of state today appeared care worn and sad following the complete capture of Vera Cruz.

• PIEDRAS NEGRAS, Mexico — Piedras Negras was evacuated by the federals after a night of wild excitement. Two thousand refugees came to the American side for protection. Crowds marched through the Piedras Negras streets shouting “Death to the gringos” until the cry became a chant in every street. The excitement became intense and then came the announcement that Gen. Guarjardo was preparing to evacuate. In a few minutes, the rush for the American side began. Volunteers who had just been proclaiming their intention of fighting the Americans soon were sending their families to the American side for protection. This morning the international bridge was blocked by refugees and was finally closed by the immigration officers.

• Dr. D.B. Haworth, who is the U.S. Marines recruiter for Ottawa, has written to Washington for a commission to organize a company in Ottawa if volunteers are called for. War was the word on Main Street last night and this morning. Excitement prevailed everywhere. The air vibrated with war talk. There is no local company of the Kansas National Guard here now, but there are a large number of men who have had military training. Ottawa had a company of national guards several years ago. Mr. Parker took the veterans of the Twentieth Kansas [company] one Fourth of July and fought a sham battle with the company. The Twentieth Kansas boys invaded from Forest Park and the guards were stationed in the Pickrell grove. W.R. Cody was captain of a militia company here several years ago. Col. Flanders of the Twentieth, now of Paola, was a captain here once.

• VERA CRUZ, Mexico — The Americans captured Vera Cruz, but at the cost of the lives of more than 200 men and a much larger number wounded. Four U.S. Marines were killed and 20 wounded. More than 200 Mexicans were killed in the fighting that followed the landing of sailors and marines.

• If it is possible under the state law, the ward lines in Ottawa will be eliminated and there will be only precincts. Mayor F.M. Harris will ask the attorney general for an opinion on this soon. When Ottawa had the councilmanic form of government, two councilmen were elected from each ward. Now the city commissioners are chosen from the city at large and there is no need for wards. The new ordinance providing for two additional voting precincts was placed upon its first reading this morning. If the city can abolish the ward lines and have only precincts, it is believed that eight precincts instead of nine will be sufficient to care for the increased vote since women obtained the right of franchise.

• A committee to investigate the hospital situation in Ottawa and to formulate tentative plans for establishing such an institution here was appointed at the meeting of the Franklin County Retailers Association last night. Bert Bell is chairman of the committee.

• TOPEKA — The damage suit of Mrs. Luella West against Gov. George H. Hodges will probably be tried in the Shawnee County District Court the first week in June. The suit is based on an alleged attack by Gov. Hodges when she visited the governor’s office in company with Mrs. Laura Buckwalter of Wichita to urge a parole for Arthur Sullivan, confined in the state penitentiary on a statutory charge. Mrs. West alleges that when she seized papers on file in the governor’s office that Gov. Hodges wrenched her arm and wrist and struck her on the breast with his fist. These charges are substantiated by Mrs. Buckwalter, but denied by Gov. Hodges and men who were in the office at the time of the alleged attack.

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