Tuesday, September 23, 2014

TODAY IN HISTORY: April 1914

By LOUIS REED, local historian | 4/28/2014

April 1914

• A loss estimated at more than $7,000 will be sustained by a fire that was discovered at about 6 o’clock this morning in Richmond and which completely destroyed the brick building of George J. Bowen and consumed all the stock and fixtures in the building and two offices in the second floor. The building, which was built four years ago at a cost of $2,200, was a complete loss and was covered by insurance in the amount of $1,500.

April 1914

• A loss estimated at more than $7,000 will be sustained by a fire that was discovered at about 6 o’clock this morning in Richmond and which completely destroyed the brick building of George J. Bowen and consumed all the stock and fixtures in the building and two offices in the second floor. The building, which was built four years ago at a cost of $2,200, was a complete loss and was covered by insurance in the amount of $1,500.

• Faithful Old Dobbin might not be on the decline, but some of his most ardent admirers are forsaking him for the automobile. The most recent entrant in the ranks of the motorists is Sheriff Nick Johnson. He purchased a Ford touring car yesterday from J.H. Houser and will use it in his work over the county. Mr. Johnson has been a strong admirer of good horse flesh for many years, and the Johnson driving team during his term as sheriff has been the pride of the county. That team can go faster and longer than almost any team in the county. But they’ll rest now, while the car is speeding over the roads unless they are called out some dark night to haul the car back to Ottawa.

• Officials with the Southern Kansas Division of the Santa Fe conferred with members of the Valley View & Mud Creek Country Club today regarding a proposed switch near the club house. The country club members want a switch near the club house and a platform to place cream and milk cans for shipment.

• A system of telephones operated by the central energy system was being connected in the city hall for exhibition this afternoon by officials of the Kansas City Long Distance Telephone Company. They are suggested as a possible aid in the solution of the telephone system in Ottawa. These phones can be attached with four on each party line and are said to be satisfactory for residence use. Superintendent A.B. Clarke, who was here, said the average in Ottawa for each resident to use his phone is four times daily. If these telephones were placed in Ottawa by the company, it would necessitate the erection of a new plant with the central energy system, costing about $50,000.

• A swimming pool in the new gymnasium will be the memorial that the Ottawa University class of 1914 will donate to the school this year. The dimensions of the new pool will be 20 feet by 55 feet with the depth ranging from 3 feet, 10 inches to 8 feet, and will be in the basement of the new building.

• The first of May will be celebrated in the different grade schools of Ottawa with programs consisting of songs and folk dances. The Eugene Field School program will be held in the school yard on a platform erected especially for this purpose and will begin at 9 o’clock in the morning. The Washington School program will be at 2 o’clock in the park directly south of the City Library. At the Lincoln School, the program will begin at 2 o’clock and will consist of folk dancing, singing and drills. Pupils from the Hawthorne School will assist in the May Fete given by the students of Ottawa University.

• Ottawa is going to entertain the Kansas State Baptist Convention next October just 50 years after the first convention ever held in Ottawa and 54 years after the organization of the state association. Ottawa entertained the state convention for the first time in June, 1864, one month after the First Baptist Church was organized. Five years later in 1869, the state convention was here again. Other years when it has met in Ottawa have been 1875, 1878, 1893, 1899 and this year will be the seventh time.

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