Friday, August 01, 2014

State reports wild horse herpes case

By The Herald Staff | 4/30/2014

TOPEKA — A horse in northeast Kansas was euthanized after it was confirmed the animal contracted a wild type of a non-neurotropic case of Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1), a state agency said Tuesday.

After the horse was put down, samples were sent to the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory April 25, at which time preliminary tests showed lesions consistent to EHV-1, Bill Brown, Kansas Department of Agriculture animal health commissioner, said in a news release. Additional samples were sent to Equine Diagnostics Services in Lexington, Kentucky, which confirmed the diagnosis.

TOPEKA — A horse in northeast Kansas was euthanized after it was confirmed the animal contracted a wild type of a non-neurotropic case of Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1), a state agency said Tuesday.

After the horse was put down, samples were sent to the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory April 25, at which time preliminary tests showed lesions consistent to EHV-1, Bill Brown, Kansas Department of Agriculture animal health commissioner, said in a news release. Additional samples were sent to Equine Diagnostics Services in Lexington, Kentucky, which confirmed the diagnosis.

The horse had been to a barrel racing event April 10-13 in Lincoln, Nebraska, where a Wisconsin horse also had been confirmed positive for EHV-1 and euthanized.

The state agency encouraged horse owners to monitor animals carefully for signs of the disease, including checking temperatures twice a day for changes and implementing good biosecurity practices for an equine facility. The virus is easily spread through airborne transmission, horse-to-horse contact and contact with nasal secretion on items, including caregivers’ hands, clothing, shoes or vehicles, the agency said.

Symptoms of the disease include fever, nasal discharge, wobbly gait, hind-end weakness and dribbling of urine. The neurological form of the disease often is fatal.

The agency isn’t restricting any equine events or movements now, but horse owners are encouraged to take precautionary measures when traveling or participating in equine events.

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