Thursday, October 02, 2014

Roberts files for Senate, but not without residency controversy

By The Herald Staff | 5/2/2014

TOPEKA — A veteran Kansas lawmaker filed for re-election Friday, but his primary opponent in the GOP race said the three-term legislator should be barred from running.

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, hadn’t even filed his paperwork Friday when Republican challenger Milton Wolf, a Kansas doctor, called on Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State, to reject Roberts from the ballot. Wolf alleges Roberts does not truly live in Kansas, rather he maintains his residence in Alexandria, Virginia. The claim was substantiated earlier this year by a New York Times article, though Roberts has said he rents a room and bathroom from supporters in Dodge City, as well as owning a duplex unit in Dodge City that he rents out, according to media reports.

TOPEKA — A veteran Kansas lawmaker filed for re-election Friday, but his primary opponent in the GOP race said the three-term legislator should be barred from running.

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, hadn’t even filed his paperwork Friday when Republican challenger Milton Wolf, a Kansas doctor, called on Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State, to reject Roberts from the ballot. Wolf alleges Roberts does not truly live in Kansas, rather he maintains his residence in Alexandria, Virginia. The claim was substantiated earlier this year by a New York Times article, though Roberts has said he rents a room and bathroom from supporters in Dodge City, as well as owning a duplex unit in Dodge City that he rents out, according to media reports.

In a letter to Kobach, Wolf cited Article 1, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, which reads, “No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United States and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen.”

Kobach said he doesn’t have the authority to block Roberts from running for re-election, according to media reports. A formal objection must first be filed to block someone from the ballot, he said, and then a state board would help decide the outcome.

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