Friday, December 19, 2014

Elite Citizen Scholar: Alexis Yelland

5/16/2014

Helping others in need can be more meaningful in a smaller community, Alexis Yelland, West Franklin High School senior, said.

“As a citizen in your community, you should want to do the best you can to help people out. Especially in a small community where sometimes help is needed even more,” Yelland said. “People may not remember what you said to them, but they will always remember how they felt.”

Helping others in need can be more meaningful in a smaller community, Alexis Yelland, West Franklin High School senior, said.

“As a citizen in your community, you should want to do the best you can to help people out. Especially in a small community where sometimes help is needed even more,” Yelland said. “People may not remember what you said to them, but they will always remember how they felt.”

Yelland said she realized how important it was to give back when she participated in her first blood drive.

“I had the opportunity to donate blood for the first time and that’s when it hit me,” she said. “If I was to be in a serious accident and was in need of a blood transfusion, I want to know that it will always available to me.”

Yelland, the daughter of Michael and Teresa Yelland, Quenemo, aided her community through her work with Future Business Leaders of America. She said when her senior class was in fifth grade, they were unable to participate in a program called Exchange City, which inspired them to organize the program for current elementary school students.

“We did not have the experience that we feel that every kid should get the opportunity to have,” she said of Exchange City. “As Future Business Leaders, this is a great way for me and my chapter to show the skills that FBLA has taught us over the past four years and put them to good use.”

She said planning the event took months, and included about 65 elementary students from Williamsburg and Appanoose elementary schools. The event might have helped heal some wounds too, she said.

“This project was not only successful, but it really helped bring the community together,” Yelland said. “Our district has been split up since the consolidation [of Pomona and Williamsburg high schools] and has always has those division lines between the individual cities and their alumni. When my chapter is able to put together an event and bring the kids from all over the community, it helps heal those previous wounds.”

While the plan was to educate the younger students, she said both teachers and students benefitted from the project.

“Not only did this project enhance the education of the younger kids, but also it helped my chapter members personally,” Yelland said. “So many of them had a blast running the Exchange City and have their very own suggestions for next year. It even helped one of my members realize what she wants to do after college. Allowing her to work the after school programs during the lesson plans and the opening day really encouraged her to continue to chase her dream to be an elementary teacher.”

Along with FBLA, Yelland participated in National Honor Society, student council, band and several athletic activities including basketball, volleyball, softball, cross country, track and dance. She also participated in Girl Scouts for 10 years, from 2001 to 2011.

Yelland said she plans to attend Washburn University in Topeka to major in business management and marketing, while also focusing on graphic design. She said her goal for college is to make her way to Stanford University. Although she has not made that dream come true yet, she hopes to accomplish it after her time at Washburn.

She said she wants to apply for an internship at Google as a web designer and programmer.

“If that plan does not work out the way I want, luckily I have a backup plan,” she said. “I will acquire my degrees in graphic design and business and open up my own printing shop and be a professional graphic designer on my own.”

comments powered by Disqus