Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Franklin County under drought watch

By The Herald Staff | 5/21/2014

TOPEKA — Though thunderstorms are forecasted through the end of the week, Franklin County remains under a drought watch, the governor’s office said Wednesday.

All 105 counties are facing drought conditions, according to Gov. Sam Brownback’s office, with each listed either in an emergency, warning or watch status. The status reflects the severity of drought conditions with Franklin County facing the least dangerous status. More than half of Kansas counties, however, are listed under the emergency status.

TOPEKA — Though thunderstorms are forecasted through the end of the week, Franklin County remains under a drought watch, the governor’s office said Wednesday.

All 105 counties are facing drought conditions, according to Gov. Sam Brownback’s office, with each listed either in an emergency, warning or watch status. The status reflects the severity of drought conditions with Franklin County facing the least dangerous status. More than half of Kansas counties, however, are listed under the emergency status.

“Kansans need to know no matter where you live in the state, the drought is not over. Some areas have been experiencing drought for almost five years,” Brownback said. “Continued below normal precipitation patterns are not only depleting the little soil moisture we have, but is resulting in below normal levels in our reservoirs and further decline of our stream flow conditions.”

The updated drought declaration Wednesday moved 26 counties into a warning status and 23 into a watch status, while 56 counties are in emergency status. The action was recommended by Tracy Streeter, director of the Kansas Water Office and chair of the Governor’s Drought Response Team.

“It is imperative we closely monitor conditions for the state as they could deteriorate quickly with no reserves as we start to enter warmer and drier months,” Streeter said. “Some areas of Kansas are behind more than seven inches in soil moisture and the seasonal outlook shows increased drought conditions shifting farther east than originally projected.”

Counties in the emergency stage remain eligible for emergency use of water from certain state fishing lakes due to the Kansas Water Office Memorandum of Understanding with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

comments powered by Disqus