Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Longtime Viking coach, teacher retires

By DYLAN LYSEN, Herald Staff Writer | 5/26/2014

RICHMOND — John Schultze has been a fixture in the Central Heights school district for decades, Tom Horstick said.

“I remember him back as a student, and all the way to the time to having him on my staff,” Horstick, Central Heights High School principal, said.

RICHMOND — John Schultze has been a fixture in the Central Heights school district for decades, Tom Horstick said.

“I remember him back as a student, and all the way to the time to having him on my staff,” Horstick, Central Heights High School principal, said.

After 52 years teaching young students, 39 of which were spent at Central Heights, Schultze retired at the end of the school year. Friday was his last day. The school district played host to a retirement assembly and reception for Schultze to recognize his long service, Lori Hower, Central Heights business teacher, said.

Schultze already has plans for the next chapter of his life.

“I’ll do a little subbing, play some golf and maybe a little bit of traveling,” Schultze said.

Schultze taught in Nebraska, Burr Oak and Virgil before coming to Central Heights. He coached at every teaching stop he made, he said, including basketball, track and cross country. Central Heights has meant the most to him, he said. The school track even bears his name. Schultze was honored to receive the recognition, he said.

When asked what he’ll miss most about Central Heights, Schultze said he hadn’t yet thought about it.

The school, however, certainly will miss Schultze’s service, Horstick said, because he helped wherever needed, including serving as the track coach for the majority of his time and winning a state championship in track and field in spring 1996. Horstick said the school named the track after Schultze in honor of his work and his time as the coach. Schultze is one of the most talkative and joking teachers on staff, he said.

“He’s kind of a throwback, and you just can’t replace guys like that,” Horstick said. “This is a typical John statement, but after we named [the track], he said to me, ‘Thank god it’s not the John Schultze Memorial Track.’”

Schultze always was one of the first teachers to arrive at school, often with coffee in hand, Horstick said.

“He gets down here around 6 [a.m.] with the coffee. He’s here before everybody,” Horstick said. “I told him, I don’t know who’s going to make the coffee next year.”

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