Saturday, December 20, 2014

OHS grad’s ‘Code Black’ delves into dark territory

By CLINTON DICK, Herald Staff Writer | 6/2/2014

A real-life situation gets bumped up a notch in Daniel Sink’s new book, the author and 1998 Ottawa High School graduate said.

Sink, 34, Kansas City, released his second novel, “Code Black,” over Memorial Day weekend, he said.

A real-life situation gets bumped up a notch in Daniel Sink’s new book, the author and 1998 Ottawa High School graduate said.

Sink, 34, Kansas City, released his second novel, “Code Black,” over Memorial Day weekend, he said.

The plot focuses on the story of Chris Jacobs, a highly-skilled paramedic who has seen too much and is ready to throw in the towel on his career. But with a disabled son at home who requires constant medical care, Jacobs needs his medical benefits. After working long hours one night, Jacobs makes a mistake and a patient dies. When his partner threatens to turn him in, Jacobs kills him in the heat of the moment. He finds himself fighting to cover up the truth to preserve his family, career and freedom, according to a news release about the book.

While the story is fictional, Sink said, there’s truth behind his idea for the book.

“The idea came to me when, like I said, I work as a paramedic, and there is that whole chance that you could mess up on a call,” Sink said. “I’ve worked in private [Emergency Medical Services] for a while. As a paramedic, you have a lot more freedom than a nurse in a hospital and there was a situation that came to mind where someone messed up on a call and tried to cover it up, and I decided to take it a step farther in, like, what if they had more to lose? There is some truth behind the story, I just took it a step further.”

The 284-page novel was a way for Sink to write about the atmosphere and conditions of his work as a paramedic, he said.

“I just wanted to dive into the actual work I did,” Sink said. “[The book] talks about the environments we have to work in, working long shifts, the physical strain of carrying large people down several flights of stairs ... there is a lot of that. Some of that is taken from my personal experience.”

The book is available on amazon.com as well as Sink’s website www.danielsink.com

Though it has only been out for a short time, Sink said he already has gotten a lot of positive feedback.

“I’m not on the New York Times best-seller list, but there have been people who have read it and said they thought it had a very powerful ending and they couldn’t put it down,” he said. “Everybody seems to like it, especially the ending.”

It took Sink three months to write “Code Black” from start to finish, not including the editing process, he said. During that time, he wrote at least 3,000 words a day, he said.

“I worked really hard on it,” Sink said. “A lot of people ask me if I have writer’s block and I’m like, ‘No.’ I’m always coming up with ideas.”

Sink’s first novel, “Stovepipe,” was released Oct. 26, 2013, and sold about 5,000 copies, he said.

“As you write more, you grow as a writer,” he said. “I got good reviews on ‘Stovepipe,’ and I look back and I read it and my mistakes kind of jump out to me on the page. There are certain things that are preferred in the industry that you change as you write your next book.”

Sink said he will be in Ottawa July 17 to promote his new book. He now is working on a sequel to “Stovepipe” that he hopes to have finished by the end of the year, he said.

“It is called ‘The Irishman’s Daughter,’” Sink said. “I just finished the first chapter of it.”

comments powered by Disqus