Thursday, October 23, 2014

Thirsty for history? Soda fountains offer tonic for summer entertainment

By The Herald Staff | 6/9/2014

Two events spotlighting Franklin County’s history — from soda fountains to a key figure behind the establishment of Ottawa University — are scheduled this week.

Area residents are invited to attend a program about the glory days of soda fountains 7 p.m. today at the Old Depot Museum, 135 W. Tecumseh St., Ottawa. The program, sponsored by the Ottawa Library, is expected to talk about tonics that evolved into refreshments such as the Brown Cow and the Mudslide, according to a Franklin County Historical Society news release. The program is set to explore soda fountains in Kansas and the revival of the soda fountain throughout the nation, the release said.

Two events spotlighting Franklin County’s history — from soda fountains to a key figure behind the establishment of Ottawa University — are scheduled this week.

Area residents are invited to attend a program about the glory days of soda fountains 7 p.m. today at the Old Depot Museum, 135 W. Tecumseh St., Ottawa. The program, sponsored by the Ottawa Library, is expected to talk about tonics that evolved into refreshments such as the Brown Cow and the Mudslide, according to a Franklin County Historical Society news release. The program is set to explore soda fountains in Kansas and the revival of the soda fountain throughout the nation, the release said.

Attendees can enjoy a soda-inspired refreshment and visit the fountain on display at the museum, the release said. Cindy Higgins of the Kansas Humanities Council is the guest speaker. For more information, call the Ottawa Library, (785) 242-3080.

The Franklin County Historical Society’s Lunch & Learn series continues noon Thursday with a program about John Tecumseh “Tauy” Jones at the Franklin County Records and Research Center, 1124 W. Seventh St. Terrace, Ottawa.

Half English, half Chippewa, Jones came to Kansas to interpret for the Pottawatomie Indians in 1838, the historical society news release said.

Jones worked with missionaries, operated a trading post, hid slaves escaping the South, was burned out of his home twice by Missouri border ruffians, and helped found Ottawa University, the release said.

Deborah Barker, executive director of the Franklin County Historical Society, is expected to discuss Jones’ life. The Lunch & Learn series is free and no reservations are required. Attendees are invited to bring their lunches, and water and iced tea will be provided, the release said.

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