Friday, April 18, 2014

Wellsville city officials talk growth, intermodal

By The Herald Staff | 7/15/2013

WELLSVILLE — The Wellsville City Council voted 5-0 Wednesday for city attorney Patrick Reavy to draw up the paperwork to allow Clint Burkdoll to build a single-family residential structure on a 20-acre parcel of land he owns just north of Glenwood Acres in Wellsville.

The paperwork Reavy draws up is scheduled to be voted on at the next city council meeting July 31. The decision did not come without some debate. Travis Jones, city councilman, expressed worries that if the city allowed the home’s construction without some form of written agreement, the city would not be able to expand to the north.

WELLSVILLE — The Wellsville City Council voted 5-0 Wednesday for city attorney Patrick Reavy to draw up the paperwork to allow Clint Burkdoll to build a single-family residential structure on a 20-acre parcel of land he owns just north of Glenwood Acres in Wellsville.

The paperwork Reavy draws up is scheduled to be voted on at the next city council meeting July 31. The decision did not come without some debate. Travis Jones, city councilman, expressed worries that if the city allowed the home’s construction without some form of written agreement, the city would not be able to expand to the north.

“If we allow this 20 acres of land to be built on, we are cutting off the neck of where we are going to be growing,” Jones said during the meeting. “If we need to run Elm Street through (the property), it will be sooner rather than later.”

The new BNSF Railway intermodal facility near Edgerton and other factors should help the town’s growth, Jones said, and growth would occur northward.

Burkdoll’s property currently is land-locked and the only access is a city right-of-way at Elm Street and Meadowbrook Lane, Reavy said. The city is allowing access for Burkdoll and his family until further development is made, he said. Reavy also said that the current plan is to draw up an easement that would dedicate the property to the city for future use as far as road construction.

Wes Brown, building inspector, suggested it might help both parties if Elm Street would run through the far west side of Burkdoll’s property, if needed in the future. Burkdoll said that wouldn’t be an issue for him as long as it didn’t cut down the middle of his property, according to the meeting’s minutes. Burkdoll cited several building challenges on his property including drainage problems.

The city planning commission previously voted to allow Burkdoll to build on the land with the stipulations that there was sufficient turnaround space for emergency vehicles at the residence, and that there would be a stop sign placed on Elm Street when approaching Meadowbrook Lane from the north.

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