Saturday, October 25, 2014

County: Spend $25K now, save repair costs later

By DYLAN LYSEN, Herald Staff Writer | 8/1/2014

With a new HVAC system nearing completion, now is as good as any time to fix a few other bumps and bruises the Franklin County Courthouse has received in its long history, county leaders agreed this week.

The county has an opportunity to address several concerns unrelated to the HVAC project, Dan Rowe, Treanor Architects president, Topeka, told the Franklin County Board of Commissioners Monday. The aging courthouse, 301 S. Main St., Ottawa, was built in 1893 on a design by famed Ottawa architect George Washburn.

With a new HVAC system nearing completion, now is as good as any time to fix a few other bumps and bruises the Franklin County Courthouse has received in its long history, county leaders agreed this week.

The county has an opportunity to address several concerns unrelated to the HVAC project, Dan Rowe, Treanor Architects president, Topeka, told the Franklin County Board of Commissioners Monday. The aging courthouse, 301 S. Main St., Ottawa, was built in 1893 on a design by famed Ottawa architect George Washburn.

Rowe proposed a change order to address repairing cracks and holes throughout the building, repairing the floor in a room that has settled incorrectly, repairing fallen ceiling on the first floor, and repairing and repainting the ceiling in the historic courtroom, according to county documents.

The board approved the change order Wednesday.

Addressing the items noted in the change order might not be necessary for completing the HVAC project, Steve Harris, board chair, said Monday, but doing the work now would save the county time and money.

“We’ve got these folks on site already with things we’ve already got identified,” Harris said. “If it’s something that needs to be done later on, and we have to call somebody back, it will probably cost us more because we’ve already got the contractor in place.”

Fixing the items using a change order is set to cost the county about $25,500, according to the county documents, which is about half what it would cost if the issues were addressed as a wholly separate project, Rowe said.

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