Saturday, November 01, 2014

Planners nix zoning change in Wellsville

By CLINTON DICK, Herald Staff Writer | 10/18/2013

Rex Allen, Wellsville, breathed a sigh of relief Wednesday night that the chances of a proposed Dollar General in his back yard have slimmed.

“I hate to see the town isn’t going to grow, but I was pleased [the store] isn’t going to go in my front yard,” Allen, who lives in the 800 block of Chilton Avenue in Wellsville, said. “I know there is a way that it would work for that Dollar General to come in. I know they’ll be on K-33, and that is where they need to be.”

Rex Allen, Wellsville, breathed a sigh of relief Wednesday night that the chances of a proposed Dollar General in his back yard have slimmed.

“I hate to see the town isn’t going to grow, but I was pleased [the store] isn’t going to go in my front yard,” Allen, who lives in the 800 block of Chilton Avenue in Wellsville, said. “I know there is a way that it would work for that Dollar General to come in. I know they’ll be on K-33, and that is where they need to be.”

During a crowded Wednesday meeting, the Wellsville Planning Commission voted 5-0 to recommend the Wellsville City Council not approve a proposed change in zoning from residential to commercial at 824 Chilton Ave., which would have paved the way for a development group to build a Dollar General on that tract of land in the primarily residential neighborhood.

While the planning commission’s vote does not finalize the issue, it does affect the likelihood of the city council passing the measure.

The final decision now will go to the Wellsville City Council, which is scheduled to meet 6 p.m. Oct. 30 at Wellsville City Hall, 411 Main St. In order to reverse the planning commission’s recommendation, the council will need a super majority vote.

The property being considered for rezoning is directly north of the Wellsville Market across Pendleton Avenue on K-33.

Tyler Oliver of Henzlik-Oliver Real Estate in Overland Park, which is the development firm for the project, was not available to comment on the commission’s vote, but did make a short presentation on the design of the building to the commission and citizens at the meeting. He said the 9,000 square-foot building would have a parking lot with 30 parking spaces and could welcome about 13 cars per hour to the store from K-33 and Pendleton Avenue traffic. In addition, Oliver said, there would be no access to the store from Chilton Avenue.

Oliver added that the store would be open 9 a.m. to 8 or 9 p.m., and all store deliveries would be made during store hours, Oliver said. Other designs on the building include two toilets within the store, two lights on the front of the building facing east, a 36-foot driveway and a 6-foot wooden privacy fence along with planted cypress trees around the building to shield neighbors from the building.

Many citizens protesting the rezoning at the meeting shared they were concerned the bright lights and bustle of the building would disrupt a quiet neighborhood area, along with the value of homeowner’s property going down for those living on Chilton Avenue, among other things.

“I have a lot of concerns about the streets and sewer problems this brings,” Justin Allen, Wellsville, said during the meeting. “It is going to be a good place, but it is a bad spot to put it.”

Jeff Seymour, executive director of the Franklin County Development Council, delivered a retail leakage report for Wellsville to the commission at the meeting, which showed a record of supply and demand of certain goods within the community.

“It was neutral information regarding the rezoning,” Seymour said. “We want them to have as much information of retail evaluation as possible. (According to the report) there is a lot of retail that leaves Wellsville and a lot of money that is spent elsewhere because there aren’t the retail businesses to support the expenditures the citizens within the community are willing to make.”

Both Seymour and Allen said they plan to be in attendance for the city council’s vote on the rezoning.

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