Saturday, October 25, 2014

Major Kansas insurance provider to extend policies canceled by new law

By The Herald Staff | 11/20/2013

WASHINGTON — Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas announced Tuesday it will allow consumers to extend individual and small group benefit plans deemed inadequate under the Affordable Care Act’s new requirements.

The company previously said about 9,500 Kansas customers would lose their insurance because of the requirements of the legislation, also known as Obamacare. President Obama said late last week his administration would allow insurance companies a one-year extension to continue to carry customers’ policies that otherwise would be eliminated. Some companies and state government agencies said the cancellations could not be undone because the changes already were in effect.

WASHINGTON — Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas announced Tuesday it will allow consumers to extend individual and small group benefit plans deemed inadequate under the Affordable Care Act’s new requirements.

The company previously said about 9,500 Kansas customers would lose their insurance because of the requirements of the legislation, also known as Obamacare. President Obama said late last week his administration would allow insurance companies a one-year extension to continue to carry customers’ policies that otherwise would be eliminated. Some companies and state government agencies said the cancellations could not be undone because the changes already were in effect.

U.S. Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Kan., applauded Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas’ decision on the delay.

“This is good news for the nearly 10,000 Kansans who liked their Blue Cross Blue Shield plans, and did not want to lose them at the end of this year thanks to Obamacare,” she said. “Unfortunately, this is only a Band-Aid for a badly broken law. The president’s latest exemption only allows people to keep these plans temporarily — for one year. It means these folks will still have their plans canceled at the end of next year.”

Jenkins and U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., both have spoken on the floors of Congress, telling stories of everyday Kansans who have received cancellation notices from their insurance companies because of Obamacare.

Obama last week acknowledged problems with both the rollout of the Affordable Care Act’s marketplace portal, as well with his promises that Americans could keep existing health care plans if they liked them.

After doing some “Monday morning quarterbacking,” Obama said his team has had “two fumbles on a big game, but the game’s not over.”

comments powered by Disqus