Thursday, December 18, 2014

Foreign voices

2/7/2014

[Editor’s note: The following is in response to Jeanny Sharp’s Thursday editorial, “‘Foreign’ voices prove we’re ‘America, the Beautiful’.”]

I do not think that the current uproar over the recent Coca-Cola Super Bowl commercial is based on who is more or less American or whom loves this country. I believe it has much more to do with the content of the song and the intent with which it was written. Had the song been sung in English with or without accents, it still could have showed the same scenic America the song represents. I completely agree that America has long been a melting pot for immigration, and I hope that never changes.

[Editor’s note: The following is in response to Jeanny Sharp’s Thursday editorial, “‘Foreign’ voices prove we’re ‘America, the Beautiful’.”]

I do not think that the current uproar over the recent Coca-Cola Super Bowl commercial is based on who is more or less American or whom loves this country. I believe it has much more to do with the content of the song and the intent with which it was written. Had the song been sung in English with or without accents, it still could have showed the same scenic America the song represents. I completely agree that America has long been a melting pot for immigration, and I hope that never changes.

The song itself, “America, the Beautiful” ranks right up there with the Star Spangled Banner for most Americans, and remains an iconic song from most of our childhoods. I don’t believe any U.S. citizen would want to hear our National Anthem sung in any language other than English, so why should any other song that so clearly represents America be sung in other languages?

With the threat of amnesty for illegal immigrants already in the United States from our illustrious president and Congress, I believe many Americans are on edge, and perhaps that song selection was a bit close to the other issue, whether intentional or not. I also believe that for far too long Americans have been brainwashed into bending over backward to accommodate any given group of immigrants whom have chosen to live in the United States. With 30 years of military background and traveling, I know of no other country even remotely willing to do this for American citizens visiting or choosing to live in foreign countries.

As I said, I am in no way, shape or form against legal immigration. My great-grandparents were originally from Denmark, and I still remember the stories my grandfather use to tell us. However, upon their arrival in America, they immediately set out to be American citizens and my grandfather served in both world wars, as well as the Korean War. Those are the types of people that we should reach out to and bend over backward to accommodate.

— Richard Dewey,

Ottawa

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