Friday, August 29, 2014

True discrimination

3/3/2014

We have many in power in America who have decided the way to eliminate discrimination in America is to in fact practice harsh discrimination by punishing those with whom they morally disagree.  

In Oregon, Aaron and Melissa Klein, owners of a small family-owned bakery, on the grounds of their sincere, 2,000-year-old, Christian, historically accepted religious belief that marriage is between a man and a woman could not in good conscience participate in a lesbian wedding by baking the wedding cake. They in no way ever harmed or hated any gay people or refused to sell productd to them in their store. Their sincere religious conviction simply was they could not personally participate in a gay wedding. The gays would have in no way been deprived of the rights to a wedding cake, as in this free market there were many bakers who said they would have gladly had the business and baked it.  

We have many in power in America who have decided the way to eliminate discrimination in America is to in fact practice harsh discrimination by punishing those with whom they morally disagree.  

In Oregon, Aaron and Melissa Klein, owners of a small family-owned bakery, on the grounds of their sincere, 2,000-year-old, Christian, historically accepted religious belief that marriage is between a man and a woman could not in good conscience participate in a lesbian wedding by baking the wedding cake. They in no way ever harmed or hated any gay people or refused to sell productd to them in their store. Their sincere religious conviction simply was they could not personally participate in a gay wedding. The gays would have in no way been deprived of the rights to a wedding cake, as in this free market there were many bakers who said they would have gladly had the business and baked it.  

Because of their religious conscience (which is supposed to be protected by the constitution), gay rights groups launched protests and pickets outside the family’s store. They threatened wedding vendors who did business with the bakery. The Kleins’ children were the targets of death threats. The state of Oregon fined them several hundred thousand dollars. All these things forced them to close their small family store.  

This is the picture of true discrimination practiced in the false name of civil rights. Be honest, and compare the pain and suffering: Two American citizens suffering because they are offended that one small business turned them down for a simple wedding cake, which they could have gotten from many other businesses; Or a family whose children suffered death threats, a family who had its business associates threatened, a family who was picketed to try to hurt its business, a family fined hundreds of thousands of dollars by the state and being forced to close the family business for simply asking to not have to bake a wedding cake.

The bottom-line truth is this has nothing to do with gays being discriminated against nor their civil rights being violated. What happened is just the opposite. It was the Kleins who were truly discriminated against and had their civil rights taken away based simply on someone else being offended by their moral beliefs — not because they were seriously harmed or hurt by the Kleins.

This is about a new growing power group in America that has decided its members are the ones who will decide what religious morals and beliefs folks are allowed to have and practice. They are willing to use whatever tactics are necessary to force submission to what they decide is moral.     

We need to be thankful there are some state legislatures that have recognized this gross abuse of unconstitutional power and have made attempts to limit this abuse with new laws that should never have to be written in the first place. The problem is not those who feel forced to write new laws to protect citizens from this horrendous abuse of power and discrimination. The problem is those who have already written laws that in fact promote and allow for this horrendous true discrimination and abuse of civil rights, including harsh punishment for nothing more than a difference in one’s moral beliefs, as the Oregon case clearly proves.    

— John Comstock,

Ottawa

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