Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Gun control in crosshairs

4/14/2014

Gun control, in many circles, with no pun intended, is considered the ability to hit where you are aiming and has much more to do with breath control, trigger squeeze and line of sight than it does with any government regulations, interferences, bans or buy-back programs.

Obviously, there are those individuals whom have made personal choices to commit violent crimes with or without the assistance of a gun, and it should go without saying that the public would be better off keeping guns out of their hands. Therefore, I have absolutely nothing against background/criminal checks for purchasing a gun. Nor would I ever be unwilling to show identification to any form of law enforcement to prove my right to own and carry a legal firearm.

Gun control, in many circles, with no pun intended, is considered the ability to hit where you are aiming and has much more to do with breath control, trigger squeeze and line of sight than it does with any government regulations, interferences, bans or buy-back programs.

Obviously, there are those individuals whom have made personal choices to commit violent crimes with or without the assistance of a gun, and it should go without saying that the public would be better off keeping guns out of their hands. Therefore, I have absolutely nothing against background/criminal checks for purchasing a gun. Nor would I ever be unwilling to show identification to any form of law enforcement to prove my right to own and carry a legal firearm.

I equally believe that any law-abiding citizen over the legal age should and does have the right to bear and carry firearms, with or without a concealed carry permit. Both my wife and I have our concealed carry because the current law dictates it a must in order to conceal a weapon.

If I had my rathers, I’d much rather just strap on the old holster and carry out in the wide open for everyone to see. There are many different views on this method as well. Some will call it scary, dangerous and intimidating, or say it invites confrontation. Others will say it’s the preferred method for accessibility and/or deterrence. I tend to agree with this side of thinking. A gun doesn’t do you any good if you can’t get to it in a timely fashion when needed. If needed, one might have a matter of seconds or just a few steps to draw, aim and shoot in a life or death situation. If concealed carry were the best method for personal protection, then all law enforcement agencies would use that method, correct? Fortunately we in Kansas have a choice of either and/or both.

Despite all the push for government gun control (city, state or federal), you will never keep guns away from criminals. If they can’t buy them legally, they’ll steal them or buy them from an individual who has no conscious or one making a conscious decision to do something illegal and put profit over personal values. In fact, statistics show the No. 1 fans of government gun control are mostly criminals. Why wouldn’t they be? In their chosen profession, it’s much safer and easier to rob a home or assault an individual if you already know they don’t have a gun to defend themselves. In other areas, where there is a chance one might be shot and injured or killed, second thoughts usually win out over stupidity. Again, statistics relentlessly show higher crime rates in most areas where guns are tightly controlled, banned or some sort of gun buy-back program has been enacted.

Whether you choose open or conceal carry, you have accepted a multitude of responsibilities. You must now be more aware of your surroundings and how, when, where you would decide to act should something suddenly turn into a life or death situation. You’ve chosen to attempt to protect the lives of friends, family, neighbors and/or strangers in the right situations. You must physically practice and be proficient at drawing your weapon from your carry choice location. You must know what, when and where it is safe to do so, without accidently shooting the wrong person or someone innocent. Most importantly, you’ve already given careful consideration to the consequences of your actions in wounding or possibly killing another human being. If you haven’t taken all these things into account, perhaps you shouldn’t be carrying your gun.

As for me, I have taken all this and much more into account and have decided I am positive I could live with the consequences much easier of shooting an individual whose intent was to deprive myself or my family of a certain life enhancing possessions and/or threatening our lives, than I could live with the guilt if I stood idly by doing nothing and something wrong or bad happened to anyone of my loved ones, friends, family, neighbors or innocent bystanders.

 — Richard Dewey,

Ottawa

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