Saturday, July 26, 2014

CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL: Cat experiences ‘terrible teens’ too

By AMY NEWMARK, Chicken Soup for the Soul | 4/21/2014

“Having a pet is just like having a child,” Monica A. Andermann’s mother warned her. Monica didn’t believe her, until she got Charley, a young tuxedo cat, as she recounted in her story “Surviving Charles” for one of our books on cats.

“It was love at first sight,” Monica wrote of the moment she and her husband Bill met Charley at a shelter. But, despite being smitten, Monica had her reservations. Unlike Monica’s other, older cats, Charley was “lively, ready to experience whatever life had to offer regardless of the risks.”

“Having a pet is just like having a child,” Monica A. Andermann’s mother warned her. Monica didn’t believe her, until she got Charley, a young tuxedo cat, as she recounted in her story “Surviving Charles” for one of our books on cats.

“It was love at first sight,” Monica wrote of the moment she and her husband Bill met Charley at a shelter. But, despite being smitten, Monica had her reservations. Unlike Monica’s other, older cats, Charley was “lively, ready to experience whatever life had to offer regardless of the risks.”

Charley quickly made habits of leaping out windows, jumping on the bed and stowing himself in drawers. Once, Monica intervened just before he attacked an opossum. His adventures led to a knocked-out tooth, a sprained back and a broken leg. Monica became exasperated trying to control him, to protect him from himself. During one visit to the vet, she asked, sheepishly, “Do you think Charley might benefit from ... um ... tranquilizers?” The vet laughed and told her: “Charley’s just going through his teenage years. He’ll calm down.”

Back home, Monica called her mother. “How did you get through our teenage years?” she asked. “I just held on and waited until they were over,” was the answer. So, Monica waited and, sure enough, Charley mellowed as he aged. Later, Monica reflected on how watching Charley grow up had been like seeing a child mature. Now, “like most parents,” she realizes, “I would never have traded him or his terrible teens for anything.”

Syndicated by Chicken Soup for the Soul Publishing, online at www.chickensoup.com

comments powered by Disqus