Friday, October 24, 2014

TODAY IN HISTORY: July 1914

By LOUIS REED, local historian | 7/5/2014

July 1914

• Rain ranging in precipitation from 1 to almost 4 inches fell over Franklin County yesterday and last night, soaked the ground thoroughly, did wonders for the corn and brought a broad smile to the farmers everywhere. There was considerable wind with the storm around Richmond and Princeton. A cattle barn built on an embankment at the E. P. Pendleton farm was destroyed by the wind.

July 1914

• Rain ranging in precipitation from 1 to almost 4 inches fell over Franklin County yesterday and last night, soaked the ground thoroughly, did wonders for the corn and brought a broad smile to the farmers everywhere. There was considerable wind with the storm around Richmond and Princeton. A cattle barn built on an embankment at the E. P. Pendleton farm was destroyed by the wind.

• The automobile trip to Richmond tonight had to be canceled because of the rain and the condition of the roads. The third run of the season was planned for tonight and Richmond had made big preparations to entertain the Ottawa visitors.

• HUTCHINSON — Hutchinson has a quarter of a million fewer carriers of filth and disease as the result of the first day of the all summer fly swatting crusade being swayed by the children under the direction of the board of health. No, the flies brought to the city clerk’s office yesterday by the fourteen boys and girls who entered the fly swatting contest were not counted; there were 16 pounds of the nasty disease agents.

• The young man who was killed by the Santa Fe passenger train just east of Gardner late Monday afternoon, and whom the officers have been seeking to identify, was found today to be Cladtie Humbert of 104 South Oak St., Ottawa.

• L.C. Jones has served as president of the Franklin County Retailers Association for its first year. He has declined to serve a second term.

• Work began yesterday on the improvement in the roadway at Rattlesnake Hill west of Pomona. The work didn’t actually begin at the hill, but the first work was done at Lomax — and then was undone on account of the rain. Several cars of cement on the siding at Lomax were to have been unloaded yesterday.

• West Virginia entered the Prohibition column at midnight under the Yost Act said to be one of the most severe Prohibitory measures ever enacted in the United States. Five deaths due to intoxicants were reported yesterday from the southern portion of the state.

• Automobile license tags expired July 1 at midnight. Franklin County is rated with 445 machines, but only about 150 automobile and eight motorcycle owners have applied for new licenses.

• A Santa Fe employee stated today at the depot that whenever a well-dressed woman gets off a waiting train beyond the end of the platform to get a breath of fresh air, she finds on returning that the steps from the porter’s stool to the car step is a long one and very difficult for one with a tight skirt. But no sooner does she make the discovery than she is back on the ground again. “And do you know,” quered the employee, “that a tight-skirted woman will sometimes get off and on the train as many as four times if there is enough of a gallery watching.”

• In the July Woman’s Home Companion, a woman contributor, who declines to sign her name, writes a practical little article entitled “How Not To Be Fat.” She says that she began by noticing that stout people sleep too much. She gradually worked her alarm clock back from seven-thirty to six o’clock in the morning and put in the extra time exercising and bathing. Then she took up the habit of walking after breakfast. In 10 weeks time, she found that she was losing flesh slowly — less than half a pound a week.

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