Tuesday, September 16, 2014

CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL: Mandir the cat’s magic trick

By AMY NEWMARK, Chicken Soup for the Soul | 7/21/2014

While Jill Burns’ house was being renovated, she kept her cats safely stowed away in a room that had been specially built for them. It was a good plan, except that the cats kept getting out. Jill thought she knew who the culprits were. She called her kids downstairs, making sure to sound stern, when she asked who had left the cat room door open. When all three kids protested that they weren’t responsible, Jill was the voice of reason: “Listen, the cats aren’t magicians,” she told them. As she wrote in her story “Mandir the Magician,” published in our book about our cats’ surprising feats, this turned out not to be quite right.

Over dinner that night, one of the cats, Mandir, appeared. This time, to Jill’s relief, her husband took responsibility for being stern with the kids. Then he tracked down Mandir and deposited her in the cat room. Five minutes later, she was back. Jill’s husband was flabbergasted, and the kids were in hysterics. “I know I shut that door tight,” he exclaimed.

While Jill Burns’ house was being renovated, she kept her cats safely stowed away in a room that had been specially built for them. It was a good plan, except that the cats kept getting out. Jill thought she knew who the culprits were. She called her kids downstairs, making sure to sound stern, when she asked who had left the cat room door open. When all three kids protested that they weren’t responsible, Jill was the voice of reason: “Listen, the cats aren’t magicians,” she told them. As she wrote in her story “Mandir the Magician,” published in our book about our cats’ surprising feats, this turned out not to be quite right.

Over dinner that night, one of the cats, Mandir, appeared. This time, to Jill’s relief, her husband took responsibility for being stern with the kids. Then he tracked down Mandir and deposited her in the cat room. Five minutes later, she was back. Jill’s husband was flabbergasted, and the kids were in hysterics. “I know I shut that door tight,” he exclaimed.

Something was afoot, or “apaw,” I guess. The whole family returned Mandir to the room and then waited. After a couple of minutes, the doorknob started to jiggle and then, pop, the door swung open. Mandir sauntered out. Now the whole family was laughing. The next day, Jill’s husband installed a bolt. “Let’s see if she can open a locked door,” he said. (Fortunately, she couldn’t.) Jill, laughing, apologized to her kids for doubting them.

Syndicated by Chicken Soup for the Soul Publishing, online at www.chickensoup.com

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