Friday, November 28, 2014

Signs point out city effort, local tax dollars at work

8/13/2014

Some new signs are appearing across Ottawa, and though most people aren’t crazy about paying taxes, they might appreciate seeing some tangible evidence of their tax dollars at work.

The City of Ottawa is in the midst of utilizing a $1.1 million bond issue fund — the outcome of refinancing existing bonds — to improve a number of streets and sidewalks. Federal laws mandate sidewalks meet requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, with ramps on corner sidewalks when street improvement projects are undertaken. Consequently, at least 48 ramps are being installed at Ottawa intersections as part of this public works project. Street improvements with overlays will follow soon. All improvements are expected to be completed by Oct. 15. The improvements are taking place at some well-used intersections.

Some new signs are appearing across Ottawa, and though most people aren’t crazy about paying taxes, they might appreciate seeing some tangible evidence of their tax dollars at work.

The City of Ottawa is in the midst of utilizing a $1.1 million bond issue fund — the outcome of refinancing existing bonds — to improve a number of streets and sidewalks. Federal laws mandate sidewalks meet requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, with ramps on corner sidewalks when street improvement projects are undertaken. Consequently, at least 48 ramps are being installed at Ottawa intersections as part of this public works project. Street improvements with overlays will follow soon. All improvements are expected to be completed by Oct. 15. The improvements are taking place at some well-used intersections.

Those improvements include: Ash Street between Second and Tenth streets; Cedar Street between Eighth and Fifteenth streets; Eleventh Street between Cedar and Main streets, Willow Street from Seventh to Ninth streets; and Logan Street from Oak to Spruce streets. In case you’ve missed the construction cones and barricades, be sure to look for the signs, which read, “Your Ottawa tax dollars at work. Please drive safely.” It is a good opportunity for the city to point out its projects so they know these aren’t just random improvements and instead are ones requested by the public.

These infrastructure improvements are just a small part of where Ottawa taxpayers’ investments go and would not have been possible without astute refinancing of existing bonds. That refinancing freed up an amazing $1.1 million, which went directly into those needs Ottawans say they want — street and sidewalk improvements.

At a time when the public demands accountability for the use of their tax money, these projects clearly are positive signs of the times.

Jeanny Sharp,

editor and publisher

comments powered by Disqus