Friday, October 24, 2014

BROWN: A new school of thought on pot

By LINDA BROWN, Hold Me up a Little, Longer | 8/21/2013

Monday was our 4-year-old granddaughter’s first day of official preschool. The teachers had arranged for blackboards to be set up at the entrance as a photo opportunity for each child’s family.

Printed on the blackboard was some pertinent information about each student, like their name, their favorite food, favorite color and what they want to be when they grow up.

Monday was our 4-year-old granddaughter’s first day of official preschool. The teachers had arranged for blackboards to be set up at the entrance as a photo opportunity for each child’s family.

Printed on the blackboard was some pertinent information about each student, like their name, their favorite food, favorite color and what they want to be when they grow up.

Our little darling declared when she grows up she intends to be “Batman’s princess.”

I wish I’d known that was a career option when I was 4.

On the other hand, I suppose she could have said she wanted to be a police officer in Seattle. That city’s finest spent the past weekend rubbing shoulders with the “Emerald City” pot-heads and passing out snack bags of nacho-cheese Doritos chips to smokers feeling the “munchies.”

Please, people, I can’t make this kind of stuff up.

The occasion was the 22nd annual “Hempfest” celebrating recreational marijuana and the first pro-legalization gathering since voters in Washington State approved a ballot measure (l-502) last November legalizing recreational use of the drug.

Despite the vote, technically, public use of marijuana remains illegal, punishable by a $103 ticket. But Seattle police have only been giving people warnings since the law passed and they had no plans to write anyone up at Hempfest. Instead, they passed out the Doritos with the attached message: “We thought you might be hungry. We also thought now might be a good time for a refresher on the do’s and don’ts of l-502.”

The don’ts: “Don’t drive while high. Don’t give, sell, or shotgun weed to people under 21. Don’t use pot in public. You could be cited but we’d rather give you a warning.”

The do’s: “Do listen to Dark Side of the Moon at a reasonable volume. Do enjoy Hempfest.”

The label was signed (heart) SPD.

Within 30 minutes, 1,000 bags of Doritos were gone.

The three-day event featured crafts, music, food booths, speakers and, reportedly, plenty of pungent smoke.

Festival goers were asked for a $10 voluntary donation to help offset the $800,000 cost of the rally.

I guess “upholding the law” has a different meaning in Seattle.

That or someone inhaled.

Linda Brown is marketing director for The Ottawa Herald. Email her at lbrown@ottawaherald.com

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