Monday, September 01, 2014

Are we exceptional?

10/23/2013

[Editor’s note: The following Reader Forum item is in response to Herald Editor and Publisher Jeanny Sharp’s Oct. 10 editorial, “American exceptionalism in the workforce? Not so much.”

On Jeanny Sharp’s recommendation for the American public, she is completely 180 degrees off. My company has worked in about every county in the world during the past 50 years, and if anybody knows the American working ability versus the European, Asian, Indonesian, Japanese or about any other country in the world, I feel I do; as I have worked in all but a few.

[Editor’s note: The following Reader Forum item is in response to Herald Editor and Publisher Jeanny Sharp’s Oct. 10 editorial, “American exceptionalism in the workforce? Not so much.”

On Jeanny Sharp’s recommendation for the American public, she is completely 180 degrees off. My company has worked in about every county in the world during the past 50 years, and if anybody knows the American working ability versus the European, Asian, Indonesian, Japanese or about any other country in the world, I feel I do; as I have worked in all but a few.

Each time, I found the Americans out-worked, out-performed, out-thought any five of any person in most countries. In some countries, we have had to hire 50 people and only used three and had to leave 47 workers sitting on the ground because they would tear up more than they could help, but had to pay them because of the country we were in.

Sharp also talked about how Americans have gotten complacent; that is not true. Most countries train their people for one job and one job only, especially in the European market. Russia and the Ukrainians do not have the tools or the work ethic of the American workers. Japan learned from us to set up an assembly line and train their people for that one job and one job only. But where a problem arises, everything collapses. Any job we handle, we do around the world. I found the American worker to be very superior in that his/her ability to change directions where one direction doesn’t work, they are able to finish the job using another direction.

Comments like Sharp’s about the nuclear arms race and weapons make me want to get up and scream. If you ever have traveled much in or around the world, you would understand that other countries use and misuse power to gain respect of other countries in the world.

Sharp’s comment in regard to American workers losing jobs to overseas workers as a result of a gap in skilled labor is unfounded. The ability to hire these workers for such companies as GE and Sprint is about the ability to pay the overseas worker much less than those companies would have to pay an American worker. It is not that the Americans do not have skills to compete. It is, however, about money and the bottom line for those companies (especially for GE and Sprint).

Sharp needs to be talking about what made America great instead of what is bringing it down.

 

— Bob Dodson Sr.,

president, Dodson Aviation, Inc.,

Ottawa

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